Therapy for Problems in Teenagers

Being a parent to teenagers can be a challenging, worrying and sometimes distressing time.

Worried about your teen? We provide Therapy for Problems in Teenagers through online.

While teenagers are pushing against the system in their search for independence, parents can feel rejected, criticized and confused. The home may become a battleground with constant power wrangles and high emotion. But this is just a pale reflection of what’s going on inside your teenager’s body.

Understanding teenagers

The average teenager’s body is changing at an alarming rate, which, by the way, is one of the reasons they sleep so much!

As hormones shift and surge, the body, brain and emotions are on a permanent rollercoaster. Those raging hormones are likely to cause a range of embarrassing physical complaints for the ever self-conscious teenager to deal with. BO, spots, clumsiness and sprouting body hair to name but a few.

The extremes of emotion that adolescence are susceptible to are also partly due to hormones. Boys are coming to terms with large quantities of testosterone surging through their bodies while girls have to cope with the mood swings that accompany estrogen. But hormones are only part of the story.

Teenage psychology

The psychological goal of adolescence is to become independent from parents and establish their own identity and place within society. This involves building their own friendships and controlling their own emotional responses. Making their own decisions and moral choices based on consequences and conscience rather than fear of punishment. Developing their own beliefs and plans for the future.

It is an exciting time for teenagers, but also a very scary and challenging one. A time when the support and encouragement of parents is paramount to their successful transition into adulthood.

Tips for coping       

Be there – contrary to how it may seem at times, your teenagers do want to talk to you. But you need to let it be in their time and at their pace.

Be reassuring – a lot of teenagers are scared by the feelings they’re experiencing and the new wave of responsibilities that they have to take on. They need lots of reassurance that they’re not going mad and they will cope.

Be consistent – research shows that consistent, non-punitive limits and boundaries which also respect the young person’s boundaries will best help them to foster their own sense of security whilst in inner turmoil.

Be ready – to discuss the rationale behind your behaviour and your rules. Remember that they are learning from you how to be and think like an adult.

Be approving – research confirms that both males and females have higher self esteem in early adolescence if they perceive that they have the approval and support from their families.

Be patient – while teenagers are trying to find the right balance of behaviours and independence, they often swing too far in the opposite direction. But in time, the pendulum will swing back and settle in a more comfortable position.

Be gentle – even though your teenager may act as though they’re indestructible, their emotions are still very fragile – so handle with care.

Be loving – remember that although your child may seem to be pushing you away, they still need your love. A teenager’s silent plea is often “hold me tightly as I grow, but please don’t let me see you holding me!”

Be honest – sometimes you will feel stressed and emotional yourself. Don’t be afraid of letting your teenager know how you feel. Each time you do, you’re showing them that it’s ok not to be perfect and it’s ok not to have all the answers.

Be supported – there are literally millions of other parents out there going through the same things as you. Take time to share your burdens and let off steam. You will be better equipped to support your child, if you are getting support for yourself.

Be hopeful – this is only a phase. It is normal for teenagers to drift away from and even reject their parents. But it’s also normal for them to come back and develop a meaningful relationship that will last the rest of your lives.

How we can help

If you’re worried about your teenagers or just want to get some support in coping with the challenges of the teenage years, we provide Therapy for Problems in Teenagers through online or by personal.

Anxiety Treatment for Better Tomorrow – Part 2

At the outset, I would like to thank everyone who had gone through my earlier article and posted their valuable comments. …

Fears can be easily overcome but not Phobias – Why?

Fear and Phobia are qualitatively very different problems hence a distinction between them is useful. 1) A fear is a normal …

Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD)

Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) Social anxiety disorder (SAD), also known as social phobia, is the most common anxiety disorder …